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How Your City May Have Affected Your Raise

America's job machine remains stuck and wages have been slow to recover from the crisis. But wage growth varies considerably by metropolitan area, according to numbers from the most recent quarter released by PayScale, a Seattle-based employee compensation data company.

Over the three-month period, Boston experienced the most wage growth, followed by Seattle and then Dallas, with Miami, San Francisco, and Tampa tied for fourth place. The growth percentages for Detroit, Phoenix, and Riverside also exceed the national average, a glacial 1.3 percent.

St. Louis, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis experienced the most sluggish wage growth, at less than one percent. 

Some of America's very largest metrosNew York, Chicago, L.A., and Houstonas well as Washington, D.C., which has performed relatively well over the course of the Great Recession, saw their wage growth lag behind the national average.

Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He's also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts »

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