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Colder States = More Binge Drinking

Colder States = More Binge Drinking
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A number of commenters on my binge drinking post asked about the connection between cold temperatures and binge drinking. One wrote:

"I noticed a pattern as I look out my window on a fine January afternoon in a state that's on the high end of the binge drinking scale: It's cold, and it gets dark very early in the evening. There's not much to do here for half the year if you like to actually be outside. Drinking is a way of dealing with the depression that comes from forced inactivity. I don't think it's a coincidence that northern, non-coastal states drink heavily."

I asked Charlotta Mellendar to see if that's the case. She compared average January temperatures to the CDC figures on binge drinking.

Sure enough, the two are related (as usual, all caveats about correlation being association, not causation, apply). The correlation is -.43, or as she put it, "the warmer the winters, the less binge drinking." The converse applies as well. The graph below visualizes the connection.

Top image credit: Yellowj / Shutterstock.com

Keywords: Binge Drinking

Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He's also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts »

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